MARTRAE sessions at Leeds

As mention in a previous post, MARTRAE is hosting two sessions at the Leeds International Medieval Congress this year. In line with the IMC focus of Memory for 2018, which has also been named as the European Year of Cultural Heritage, the MARTRAE network sessions focus on ‘Commemorating Saints and Martyrs in Medieval Europe’. The focus of these sessions is to explore the multifaceted ways in which saints and martyrs are remembered and how forms of commemoration functioned in creating, perpetuating or transforming collective cultural heritage. The details of the individual sessions are given below.

Come see us in Leeds!

 

Session 523
Title Commemorating Saints and Martyrs, I: Transforming Identities in Hagiography
Date/Time Tuesday 3 July 2018: 09.00-10.30
Moderator/Chair Ann Buckley, Trinity Medieval History Research Centre, Trinity College Dublin
Paper 523-a Short Stories of Saints: New Perspectives on the Presentation of Hagiographical Memory
(Language: English)
Sarah Waidler, School of Celtic Studies, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Hagiography; Language and Literature – Celtic; Mentalities
Paper 523-b Sacrifice for Virginity’s Sake: The Case of St Cairech Dercáin and Her Charge in Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, Stowe MS B iv 2
(Language: English)
Kathryn O’Neill, Department of Celtic Languages & Literatures, Harvard University
Index Terms: Hagiography; Historiography – Medieval
Paper 523-c Óengus and His Félire: Shaping Sanctity, Memory, and Commemoration
(Language: English)
Nicole Volmering, Department of Irish & Celtic Languages, Trinity College Dublin
Index Terms: Hagiography; Language and Literature – Celtic; Religious Life
Abstract In the MARTRAE sessions we seek to explore the ways in which saints and martyrs are remembered and how forms of commemoration functioned in creating, perpetuating, or altering this collective cultural heritage. In session I, Sarah Waidler will argue that a collection of short anecdotes of the saints Ciarán of Clonmacnoise and Moling present an alternative memory from that which appears in what are often considered more ‘official’ hagiographical texts, such as Lives. Kathryn O’Neill will argue that the life of the female saint Rícenn demonstrates a shift in emphasis away from the typical topos of self-mutilation and manipulates memory to suit a new generation of readers and patrons. Nicole Volmering will argue that the reception of the Félire Óengusso and the beatification of Óengus in the hagiographical sphere transform the concepts of sanctity and commemoration originally embedded in the Félire.
Session 623
Title Commemorating Saints and Martyrs, II: Presence and (Re)presentation at Worship
Date/Time Tuesday 3 July 2018: 11.15-12.45
Moderator/Chair Nicole Volmering, Department of Irish & Celtic Languages, Trinity College Dublin
Paper 623-a Baptism ad sanctos: Remembering the Saints in the Liturgy and Objects of Baptism in Early Medieval England
(Language: English)
Carolyn Twomey, Department of History, Boston College, Massachusetts
Index Terms: Art History – General; Ecclesiastical History; Religious Life
Paper 623-b Commemorating Saints through Chant Texts: Columba and Kentigern
(Language: English)
Andrew Bull, School of Culture & Creative Arts, University of Glasgow
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Language and Literature – Latin; Literacy and Orality; Music
Paper 623-c Saints’ Books as Secondary Relics in Early Medieval Ireland
(Language: English)
Austin Rushnell, Department of Early & Medieval Irish, University College Cork
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Hagiography; Language and Literature – Celtic
Abstract In the MARTRAE sessions we seek to explore the ways in which saints and martyrs are remembered and how forms of commemoration functioned in creating, perpetuating or altering this collective cultural heritage. Drawing on the invocation of St. Susanna in the baptismal liturgy, the presence of female saints on early baptismal fonts, and saints’ lives, Carolyn Twomey will argue that baptism was a gendered ritual and argue for attention to locality in the discussion of the presence of saints at baptism. Andrew Bull will argue that the Offices of the Saints demonstrate which elements from a saint’s Life were considered worthy of distinct commemoration, and reveal how differing views and localities alter their perceived importance and function. Austin Rushnell will discuss different types of miracles attributed to saints’ books (Acts of Invulnerability, Oath Miracles, and Miscellany Book Miracles) from the Irish Saints’ Lives to support the claim that saints’ books were venerated in the Irish Church as secondary relics.

Holy Time Exhibition

Holy Time Exhibition in the Long Room (Trinity College Dublin) Photo: N. Volmering
Holy Time Exhibition in the Long Room (Trinity College Dublin)

Dear colleagues and readers,

This week I have the pleasure of hosting an exhibition in the Trinity Long Room (above the Book of Kells exhibition). On display are a selection of calendars and martyrologies from the Trinity collections. To accommodate those of you who cannot visit, however, I am pleased to announce that there is also a digital exhibition, which has nearly all items from the Trinity exhibition, and then some more. It is available both on the Trinity Library website  and on http://www.holytime.martrae.net (also available under the Events menu). Enjoy!

O’Curry’s transcript and translation of the Féilire Óengusso

Not available on the digital exhibition at the moment is this copy of O’Curry’s transcription and translation of the Féilire Óengusso from the Leabhar Breac (RIA 23.P.16), now part of the Reeves collection. It has never been published, though it formed the basis for Whitley Stokes’ 1880 edition. O’Curry’s copy also includes extensive indices.

 

 

CFP Leeds IMC 2018

In line with the IMC focus of Memory for 2018, which has also been named as the European Year of Cultural Heritage, the newly-launched MARTRAE network is organizing sessions on ‘Commemorating Saints and Martyrs in Medieval Europe’. The focus of these sessions is to explore the multifaceted ways in which saints and martyrs are remembered and how forms of commemoration functioned in creating, perpetuating or transforming collective cultural heritage. Papers may focus on tangible as well as intangible forms of commemoration, including (but not limited to): devotional and liturgical practices; material aspects of commemoration in the form of relics, devotional objects and manuscripts; the conceptualisation of martyrdom and sainthood; the legacy and function of medieval forms of commemoration in the modern world; harmony and disharmony in remembering; landscapes as vehicles or anchors for commemoration; and the role of martyrdom in shaping or manipulating identities.

Please send abstracts of ca. 250 words to Nicole Volmering at volmern@tcd.ie or Ann Buckley at buckleai@tcd.ie by September 20th.

New publication

I am happy to share with you that Frederick Bigg‘s latest publication, “Bede’s ‘Martyrologium’ and the ‘Martyrologium Hieronymianum'”, Analecta Bollandiana 134, no. , 241-278, is now available > here <.

Abstract
Cet article remet en question deux hypothèses qui ont guidé jusqu’ici l’étude des martyrologes. Selon l’A., le Martyrologium Hieronymianum n’a contenu aucun éloge historique: ceux-ci sont en réalité une création de Bède; de son côté, le Martyrologium de Bède ne comportait pas de brèves entrées, qui sont caractéristiques du Hiéronymien. Bien qu’il opère une distinction plus nette entre ces deux œuvres, l’article révèle également l’importance accordée par Bède, sa vie durant, au Martyrologe Hiéronymien comme source, et son profond attachement à l’autorité que celle-ci partageait avec la tradition liturgique.

AB2016